Slow Shutter Speed Photography Tips


Cars drive by, their taillights leaving amazing red trails through dark streets, There and gone in the blink of an eye. A merry-go-round at your local carnival whips around faster and faster with its lights flashing on and off and its horses and its carriages blurring together into one steady stream of motion. These are the awesome sights we can only capture with slow shutter speed (long exposure) photography. The longer a camera‘s shutter remains open, the more light it takes in. Photographers can use that fact to create breathtaking images that capture the beauty of motion. Something as simple as a glow stick can be used to paint a vivid trail of light in the air, and slow shutter speeds can lend cars or cyclists or Ferris wheels a dramatic sense of speed.

Bottom line, slow shutter photography just looks cool notwithstanding it can add depth to your photography. There’s nothing more boring then a photograph of a car on a race track shot at a fast speed See Example. Nevertheless this might be a great time to use that slow shutter technic. “Try it for yourself”. You can capture the speed and lights of a bustling city’s nightlife without being an expert. It’s not that tough. To get started, just grab a camera — preferably something with more adjustable settings than your typical point-and-shoot — and check out these five tips for slow shutter speed photography.

1) Use a Tripod Want a steady shot? Use a tripod! When shooting at low shutter speeds. Or what if you can’t use a tripod practice panning with your upper body while holding your camera.

2) Buy a Cable Release/Wireless Trigger Taking photographs with long exposure settings requires a steady camera, which is why the tripod is an integral part of any setup.

3) Use The Timer Setting your camera’s timer from 10 – 60 seconds (use a tripod) is the perfect way to compose those cool motion filled photo associated with slow shutter speed photography.

4) Shot‘s at Night Shooting bright lights — such as hand-held LEDs or car headlights whizzing along a busy highway (use a tripod) (Cable Release or Wireless Trigger) at night lets us visualize light in motion.

5) Experiment with Light and Movement A long shutter shot can last for just a few seconds or be much longer. The light your camera catches will look very different based on that exposure time. Seek out inspiration online and try your own hand at light painting or nighttime urban photography!

Here’s My Work as Examples:

Elite national and international racers ride through the streets of Wilmington during Seventh Annual Wilmington Grand Prix Saturday, May 18, 2013, in Wilmington, Del. Luke Keough of team UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling would go to win the Seventh Annual Wilmington Grand Prix.

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Kyle Busch #18 wins the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Race Friday, May, 13, 2011 at Dover International Speedway in Dover Delaware.

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Drivers Rivera and Mundy of the No. 01 Camaro GS.R speed down the straight away during qualifying Friday, July 22, 2011, at New Jersey Motorsports Park in Millville New Jersey.

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Joey Logano #20 rounds turn two during Sprint Cup Series Practice session

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The New York City skyline featuring the empire state building taken Saturday. March 24, 2012, at Hamilton Park in Weehawken, New Jersey.

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The Gravitron ride spinning out of control at the Mount Holy Summer Fest Saturday, July 8, 2011, in Newark Delaware.

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Top ranked bike racers from the US and the world ride through the Monkey Hill course during day two of The Wilmington Grand Prix Monkey Hill Time Trials Friday, May. 17, 2013 at Brandywine Park in Wilmington Del.

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